Dr. Roger Parke, Sr. b. 1648 Hexham, Northumberland, England d. 1739 Hopewell Twp., Hunterdon Co., NJ: The Schrock-Birkey Connection

Dr. Roger Parke, Sr.

Male 1648 - 1739  (91 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All

  • Name Roger Parke  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Prefix Dr. 
    Suffix Sr. 
    Born 1648  Hexham, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 8
    Gender Male 
    Baptism 25 Jun 1648  Cartmel Parish, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    • Along with his siblings George,Thomas, James and Ann.
    Education Sometimes called Dr. because of his knowledge of herbal medicine 
    HONO Served as Justice of the Peace from 1689-1708. 
    Immigration 1682  Crosswicks, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation Yeoman 
    PURC 1682  Burlington Co., NJ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1696  Hopewell, NJ Find all individuals with events at this location 
    PURC Apr 1697  NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    • 400 acres at Wissamenson on the north side of and along Stoney Brook, part of the Quaker Society’s 30,000 acre tract along the Delaware. (Revel’s Book of Surveys, p. 14)
    PURC 1698  NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    • 100 acres for daughter Anne
    Religion Church Of England, then Quaker 
    Died 1739  Hopewell Twp., Hunterdon Co., NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    • according to Doug Park, and Parke Society.org.
    Buried Hopewell Twp., Hunterdon Co., NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 13
    • Parke-Larison Cemetery, Roger Parke farm, Stony Brook, Hopewell, Hunterdon Co., NJ. Near the intersection of Mine Rd. and Stoney Brook Rd.
    Person ID I897  Schrock-Birkey Connection
    Last Modified 12 Jun 2021 

    Father Allan Parke,   b. 15 Dec 1606, Richmond, Broughton (Furness), Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Aug 1667, Frith Or Cartmel, Lancashire Co., England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth Hodgson,   b. 29 Aug 1612, Dalton-In-Furness, Lancashire Co., England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 May 1669, Dalton-In-Furness, Lancashire Co., England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 56 years) 
    Married 1636  Cartmel Parish, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 14
    • or in Frith, North Holker
    Family ID F1357  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Anne Patison,   b. 10 Apr 1658, Hexham, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1731, Hopewell Twp., Hunterdon Co., NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Married 10 Apr 1676  Taylorbourne, Allendaile, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 6, 15, 16
    • Roger Parke was an active Quaker, or member of the Society of Friends, during at least the middle part of his life, as shown by various records....In 1676, Roger married for the second time: "Roger Parke, formerly of Cumberland, married Anne Patison at Taylorbourne, Allendaile, Northumberland, England, 2nd month, x day (April 10), 1767." This information is set forth in the Digest of Quaker Marriages for Cumberland and Northumberland Counties, England. The original marriage is reported in the records of the Holme Monthly Meetings, Book 355, page 268, filed in the Cumbria Record Office, The Castle, Cumbria, United Kingdom."

    Children 
     1. Anne Parke,   b. 1676, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between 1707-1712, Hopewell, Burlington Co., NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years)
     2. John Parke, Sr.,   b. 1677, Hexham, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1757, Hampshire Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     3. Roger Parke, Jr.,   b. 25 Jun 1684, Burlington Co., New Jersey Colony Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Nov 1755, Hopewell, Hunterdon Co., NJ Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)
    Last Modified 14 Feb 2022 
    Family ID F428  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1648 - Hexham, Northumberland, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBaptism - 25 Jun 1648 - Cartmel Parish, Lancashire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 10 Apr 1676 - Taylorbourne, Allendaile, Northumberland, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1682 - Crosswicks, NJ Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsPURC - 1682 - Burlington Co., NJ Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1696 - Hopewell, NJ Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 1739 - Hopewell Twp., Hunterdon Co., NJ Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Hopewell Twp., Hunterdon Co., NJ Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • The following information has been provided by The Parke Society:

      “Roger Parke was baptized in the Priory Church in Cartmel, Lancashire Co.,England on June 25, 1648. Roger Parke came to America from Hexham, Northumberland, England. June 1682 his letter of removal to theChesterfield Meeting near Burlington, West Jersey was dated. He may have arrived on ship the "Greyhound" in 1682 - no passenger list has been found with his name on it. Bought land in Crosswicks, NJ abt. 16 milesNE of Trenton, abt. 10 miles SE of Chesterfield to Hopewell, NJ on May24/25, 1682 from Edward Byllinge, one of the largest proprietors. (This was purchased while he was still in England). He purchased more land onJan 13, 1686 from Anthony Woodhouse in Burlington Co. NJ. He sold this land to John Watkins on Nov. 11, 1686. He lived on Crosswick's Creekbut he traveled so often to Wissaminson to study medicine under an oldIndian squaw and medicine men that his path there was called "Roger'sRoad". This road today is the road from Trenton to Hopewell, Rt. 31.About 1700 he moved his family to Hopewell as one of its first white settlers (Jonathan Stout being the first). He was a Quaker, but baptized his children in the Episcopal church in Burlington Co. so that his children would have their inheritance rights protected by being baptized as Anglicans. The Rev. John Talbot baptized them. (Historical andGenealogical Miscellany by John E. Stillwell, MD, Vol. II, Gen. Pub. Co.In. 1970, page 49) He became Baptist in 1703/4.

      Some of his Crosswick's neighbors also moved to Hopewell - JonathanEldridge, Dr. John Houghton, John Wilsford, Mary Stanisland, John Bryerley, Capt. Moses Petit, and Benjamin Clark. Roger Parke's land inHopewell was along Stony Creek near present day Mine Rd. on the north. The Indian name for Stony Brook was Wapowog. His land was adjoined byJohn Moore, George Hutchinson, Sam Bunting and Marmaduke Houseman. In1696 Edward Hunt had 200 acres near him, Andrew Smith (for ThomasSmith-1709) was next to Roger in 1698. John Gilbert, weaver, JamesMelvin, Thomas Stevenson, Nathaniel Pope, Edward Burroughs and GeorgeWoolsey became neighbors as well.

      In the "Account Book of William Penn, Quaker," in 1685, it was indicated that he paid Roger Parke, 9 pounds....shillings to "cure" aNegro. Source PA Mag. of History & Biography, Vol 35, 1911 p. 201.Roger studied with the Indian medicine men and learned to use herbs to heal his patients. He had an abundance of herbs growing in his garden.

      Just prior to coming to America he lived in Cumberland Co., England.His marriage to Ann Patison was recorded in the "Digest of QuakerMarriages for Cumberland and Northumberland Co., England" and also in theHolm Monthly Meeting, with reference to book 355, page 268. Society ofFriends, Allendaile Monthly Meeting (England). Roger became a Quaker shortly before or when he married Ann. His letter of removal from theQuaker church in England as dated June 11, 1682. His deed was dated May25, 1682 so he purchased the 200 acres from Edward Byllinge, while still in England.

      In 1685, Roger purchased 200 acres from Anthony Woodhouse, BurlingtonCo., West Jersey. In Nov. 1686, he sold the 200 acres of land he had purchased in 1682 from Edwardy Byllinge to John Watkins of Middlebrook. On June 12, 1697, Roger purchased 400 acres of land in Hopewell,Burlington Co., West Jersey which had just opened up to settlement. 1697June 12. Do. Thomas REVELL, as Trustee of the W. J. Society, to Roger PARK of Chesterfield Township, yeoman, for 400 acres of the Society's land above the Falls of Delaware, in the 30,000 acre tract. There was an old Indian village located near Roger's land, which still existed many years after he made his purchase of the land in 1697. This was the 400 acres at Wissamenson, on the North side of and along StonyBrook that he was given in April of 1697.

      Roger had 100 acres of land surveyed for his daughter Anne in May of1697, which adjoined his land.

      Prior to 1700, there was a break with the Quakers when he and neighbor Andrew Smith and others joined the Keithian movement (BurlingtonCourt Book - A Record of Quaker Jurisprudence in West Jersey, 1660-1709by H. Clay Reed and George J. Miller, American Historical Assoc.Washington DC 1944, p XXXIX and page Iii) In the same publication Roger became a Proprietor and Freeholder (p. 31) in 1684 and owned 200 acres of land. He served on the Grand Jury in 1688 (page 92) and was an Overseer in 1694 (page 185).

      Dr. Parke was very active in the community and held the position of "Justice of the Peace" as well as constable for several years. (Pioneers of Old Hopewell - Ralph Ege)

      From Cecilia Parke -
      Various church records have been checked in Cumberland and Lancashire counties, England, and after ruling out several Rogers circumstantial evidence seems to indicate that Roger Parke of Hopewell, West Jersey, was the Roger christened June 25, 1648, the son of Allan and Elizabeth Parke of Frith, Cartmel, Lancashire Co., England. Children of Allan Parke named in the Will of 1667 were: Roger, George, Thomas and James.Anne, John and Jane died as young children and were not named in Allan'sWill, but church parish records indicate they were christened as children of Allan Parke.

      To explain the names of place of birth and death, we have to go back to the history of the Cartmel Priory. The Priory was actually situated in the diocese of York, which then comprised not only the county ofYorkshire, but a small part of Cumbria and a little of Nottingham shire. Cartmel then pertained to the archdeaconry based at Richmond, far away in the North Riding area. Most of the priory's history has been lost. The history of the priory starts about 1202, when the first stone was laid for the foundation. However, the territorial law states "all my land of Cartmel" which at that time covered a lot of territory . Establishing a monastery site was difficult because of the lack of water supply, ponds, agricultural land, etc. They decided on Cartmel Valley, where they found enough water and fertile land.

      The loss of ownership records makes it difficult, but there was a small but useful piece of property in the Cartmel area. There was a grant made about 1162-90 by Thomas, son of Gospatric, of a toft with five acres of land in ALLITHWAITE, along with one area of meadow and pasture for ten cows. This would have been adequate for the Abbey. The only territorial gift recorded in Cartmel priory's foundation charter was the area afterwards known as "the Ancient Parish of Cartmel". This stretched from half-way up the east side of Windermere, along the side of the River Leven and around the sea coast to Winster, and border of Westmoreland.
      The inhabitants of the land of Cartmel in medieval times were mostly small tenant farmers, and laborers who were too few to contribute to the local resources. By 1215, the monastery had acquired other possessions, land by Gilbert of Bolton, Winterthwaite and Winder. In 1347, William de Kernotte by gave the priory certain lands in Broughton and Cartmel. Eight years earlier Robert de Walton gave the priory land "in Holker in Kertmell". Cartmel as a village existed in 1219. In 1444 the prior claimed two acres of land from Roger Rye of Halton. Carmel priory then acquired land in Furness Parish records indicate that a John Parke who married Ellen___?___ inJune 14, 1559 was from ALLITHWAITE. He might have actually died there, but his son, Sir John Parke, Jr., of Holker married Jane____?____November 1, 1595. Their children, no doubt were born there. However, son Allan's parish record indicates that he was from Richmond, Broughton, Furness and died in Frith, Cartmel, Lancashire Co., England.I have asked why all these names of places were noted and the answer was that Richmond and Broughton were of the North Riding area, whileFurness and Cartmel were in the Cumberland area, now Cumbria. Mr. Sutliff ,who is also a descendant of the Roger Parke line, has done some research on this. He stated that this could indicate the possibility that they were held as a" fee or messuage" and were the various properties of this family, some of which probably came to the family via marriage. This might suggest a family of means. Tax records were found for a John Parke in 1545 or 1595. The parchment roll was so fragile, that it was almost impossible to read, but John's name was on the tax list.

      Information was found in the" Registers of the Parish Church of Cartmel" in the County of Lancashire, 1559-1661, Vol. I, 1907.Numbering system used: Baptisms -1-117; Burials - 118-214 and Weddings -215-256. The "Ancient Parish of Cartmel" stretched from half-way up the east side of Windermere, along the side of the River Leven and around the sea coast and then along the border of Westmorland. The various estates in the area being owned by the very rich, thus, we find Cark, Holker, Broughton, Flookburg, Walton, Cartmel Fell and Bolton, The oldest wasWalton Hall where the priory had property in 1342. In this area, they found a deed dated 1545-46 called "Frith Hall grange" where the priory had fishing rights. The area depended heavily on fish for food . The"Frith " area seems to be where Allan Parke and his family lived.

      The Cark, Holker and Broughton areas within Cartmel had the Cartmel rectory, site of the priory and their lands. Cartmel Fell contained the rentals,, service, silver, customs, mills. Allithwaite in the Broughtonarea had a mill, while the Walton and Barngarth areas in Holker, Holker Mill, Cark of Cartmel were the shops in town. The "Frith" area had property for sale, rent, turbary and was in the Upper Holker area nearthe "Sands." Each area seemed to provide certain contributions to their livelihood. "The Priory of Cartmel" by J. C. Dickinson, England .

      The Priory of Cartmel is a very beautiful old parish which dates back to medieval times. We personally explored the inside of the church and was allowed to take some pictures. I then walked through the old cemetery that adjoins the church. The grounds are well kept with many old unreadable tombstones....guarded by a calico cat that has been living in the cemetery for many years. Of course, it was impossible to read some of the oldest tombstones, but the grounds were kept up. The old calico cat was lying on top of one of the very old tombstones, so of course, I had to take a picture of him.

      The name "Cartmel" is a place-name of Scandinavian origin, meaning "Sand bank by Rocky ground." The Village of Cartmel was founded by William Marshall, Earl of Pennbroke between 1189 and 1219.

      The priory had been ravished several times by the Scots starting about1313, who came from the Richmond area, and often had to be rebuilt. The priory owned many large farms, the oldest being "Walton Hall" in1342....other areas such as Holker, Broughton and Flookburg also were having to be rebuilt.

      Because meat was scarce and therefore expensive, they had to maintain extensive rights to various fishing areas in order to sustain themselves. There was also such a shortage of inhabitants, that there was never enough manpower to maintain the priory and its great grounds.Most of their trade was with Northern Ireland, establishing several monasteries there and asking in exchange, for their help if needed. Many inhabitants probably came over from Ireland to work in the Cartmel area and eventually settled there.

      Recent research in England demanded that records be checked for these areas and the following was found in "Registers of The Parish Church of Cartmel, Vol. 1 and Vol 2". Records Office, Kendal, Cumbria.

      We have no proof other than the above information found in parish registers, but have assigned the above family to Roger Parke of Hexham, Northumberland County, England to West Jersey in 1682. Research is ongoing.

      Other Roger Parkes, such as one in Croston, Lancashire Co., who married Elizabeth Rymig has been checked. From what records were available, it looks like Roger married Elizabeth July 3, 1638, but died March1, 1649, leaving a widow, Elizabeth and three children...no Roger that I could find. Endowment found for this family in the Logan Temple, LDS but we were unable to get complete records that were legible.

      Croston area shows the following: Roger Parke, born September 21,1615, father James Parke, Mother Elin. Film #452781, Ord. No. 10512.Christening date shown as the same. Batch P007951, 1543-1685, Call No.#844795, Film Printout 0455726. Next record shows Roger Parke, born about 1619, Croston, married Brigit Nelson, : Film #178043, p. 11285, Or.#24872. Also submitted by same person, Roger Parke, born Dec. 22, 1639, father, Roger Parke and mother, Brigit Nelson. Names are both spelled without the "e".

      Another submission was for a female Parke, about 1642, event?, spouse, Roger Parke, of Northumberland Co., England. No parents listed. Batch#f856081 sheet 45, Source No. 1395946, Film. Same submission: Roger Parke, born. 1664, father, Roger Parke, Northumberland Co., Eng. #Batch8560801, sheet 45, source: Film #2395946. These submissions were submitted by LDS members, not from an actual proven source as previous records and could only be what they believed to be true. Other records above were from church register records and are proven. These records submitted by LDS patrons who this information to substantiate their claim on ancestry and is not to be construed as the actual dates for Roger Parke of Hopewell, New Jersey.

      The conclusion is that the Roger Parke born in 1648 to Allan and Elizabeth Parke of Frith, Cartmel, Lancashire County, England is the same Roger Parke of Hexham who came to West Jersey, in 1682. There is a predominance of evidence to indicate this.
      Roger married Ann Patison, daughter of John and Margaret Patison of Northumberland County, England, April 10, 1676. The marriage record for Roger Parke of Hexham, Northumberland County, England was recorded in "The Digest of Quaker Marriages for Cumberland and Northumberland Co.,England". The marriage was also recorded in the Holmes Monthly Meeting, with reference to book 355, page 268. Society of Friends, Allendaile Monthly Meeting (England), LDS Film #0813511 (marriages 1663-1837).

      The marriage record indicates that Roger Parke was formerly from Cumberland County. Cumberland County at that time was very close to Lancashire and it would not have been impossible for Roger to have left his home in Cartmel and venture off to new horizons in Cumberland County. The Quaker movement was getting started in Cumberland county and from the "Letter of Removal" it is noted that Roger became a Quaker shortly before or when he married Ann Patison in 1676.

      The first confirmation on Roger Parke's arrival in America is found in the Quaker "Letter of Removal", given to him before he left England for West Jersey. The date on the Certificate was June 11, 1682, (fourth month) which indicated that he probably left England on the next available ship. His deed was dated 25th of May, 1682. Roger had purchased the 200 acres from Edward Byllinge, while still in England. (Society of Friends, Chesterfield, Burlington Co.,West Jersey, Hicksite, Film #0016513 #3, Removals)

      No passenger list has ever been found for Roger Parke or for the Patisons, who also made the voyage to Crosswicks, Burlington Co., WestJersey in 1682. However, it is possible that they arrived on the ship "Greyhound" which went aground in the Delaware River in the fall of 1682, and was reported to have carried over 350 passengers. The Bill of Lading needs to be checked which might contain names of who shipped merchandise over to Burlington County, West Jersey. Several of Dr. Parke's neighbors came over in the fall of 1682 as well as a James Parke.

      Another record was found in the "Account Book of William Penn, Quaker,"in 1685, indicating that he had paid Roger Parke, 9 pounds ...shillings, to "cure" a Negro. Source: PA. Mag. of History & Biography, Vol. 35,1911, p. 201. This seems to substantiate why he was referred to as"doctor".

      Roger Parke studied with the Indian medicine men and learned to use herbs to heal his patients. Herbal healing was very popular in the early colonies. Roger was described as having an abundance of herbs growing in his garden. We do not know if Dr. Roger Parke had previous medical training before coming to America, but it is possible that he did, as they were using herbal remedies in England for hundreds of years. Dr. Roger Parke made so many trips to Trenton, that the road he traveled on became known as "Rogers Road". It was customary for the Quakers to call someone by their first name, therefore, the road wasRoger's road, rather than Parke's road. It is also possible that he visited family members there.

      In 1685, Roger purchased 200 acres from Anthony Woodhouse, BurlingtonCo., West Jersey. In November 1686, Roger, late of Hexham, sold the 200acres of land that he had purchased in 1682 from Mr. Byllinge, to JohnWatkins of Middlebrook. On June 12, 1697, Roger purchased 400 acres of land in Hopewell, Burlington Co., West Jersey which had just opened up to settlement.

      There was an old Indian village located near Roger's land, which still existed many years after Roger Parke made his purchase in 1697. Over this path, many traveled to Stony Brook to fish and hunt. It was stated that Washington's Army passed through this area on June 23, 1778, to their encampment on the Golden and Hart farms. The wars of theRevolution were severely felt in the Hopewell Valley, during December,1776, when New Jersey was under the control of Lord Cornwall..

      Roger Parke had 100 acres of land surveyed for his daughter Anne, in May of 1697, which adjoined his land. Historian Ralph Ege stated that they did not think this Anne had ever married. Ann's 100 acres of land might have gone to her brother, John. John Parke (I) purchased 300 acres near his father. By 1735, when he lost his land, John had 600 acres.Most likely, 100 acres from his sister, Anne and 200 acres from his father, Roger Parke Sr. (1722 tax list shows only 200 acres for RogerJr... none for Roger Sr., and 300 for John). Roger Sr., might have given 200 acres of his 400 to Anne, giving her 300 acres, which she then in turn, gave to her brother, John, now giving him a total of 600 acres.

      Prior to 1700, there was a break with the Quakers when Roger Parke and neighbor, Andrew Smith, and others joined the Keithian movement being promoted by the Rev. George Keith. (Burlington Court Book -A Record ofQuaker Jurisprudence in West Jersey, 1860-1709 by H. Clay Reed and GeorgeJ. Miller, American Historical Assoc. Washington, DC, 1944, p. XXXIX and page Iii) In the same publication, Roger became a Proprietor and Freeholder (p. 31) in 1684 and owned 200 acres of land. He served on the Grand Jury in 1688 (page 92) and was an Overseer in 1694 (page 185)

      In 1703/04, Dr. Roger Parke had his three children--Anne, John and Roger Jr., baptized in what was then St. Ann's Anglican Church (later became St. Mary's) in Burlington County. No other children were noted. Andrew Smith also had his grown children baptized at the same time. Rev. Mr. John Talbot baptized them. (Historical and Genealogical Miscellany by John E. Stillwell, MD., Vol. II, Gen. Pub. Co. In. 1970. page 49). Also, "Old and Historic Churches of New Jersey". St. Mary's Protestant Episcopal Church, erected in 1703. John Talbot became the first rector of St. Mary's in 1705. Seventeen men signed the petition for soliciting Mr. Talbot, six were Christian Quakers or Keithians, which demonstrated Keith's strong influence. The Parkes later became members of the First Presbyterian Church of Hopewell (1731), which many still follow today.

      By 1735, the Roger Parke family (Roger Sr., Jr., John Sr., Jr., Andrew and Joseph) were given "Eviction Notices" to vacate the land that they had been living on for over 35 years. Thirty thousand acres of land was sold in 1665 to Dr. Daniel Coxe of England, who in turn sold land to the settlers. However, after his death, his son, Colonel Daniel Cox, who was the governor of West Jersey from 1687 to about 1690, began to make changes. After the death of Dr. Coxe, the Coxe heirs began to reclaim the 30,000 acres. The land around Hopewell had been sold for the equivalent of about fifty cents an acre. Many settlers began to buy and settle there.....one being Roger Parke, his daughter, Anne and his son, John. However, when the Coxe heirs began to reclaim their land, fifty settlers in the area decided to sue for the right to keep their land and oppose the Coxe heirs, but they were overruled by twelve Quaker jurors.

      Many of the Parkes soon left the area, except for Roger Parke, Jr., and at least three of his children. Son William, who married Sarah Jewell; Keziah, who married James Larison and Grace who married Jacob Stout, evidently remained in the Hopewell area. Others moved to other areas in Hunterdon County, taking their records with them. John Parke, eldest son of Roger Parke Sr., had the most to lose. He was forced to leave the area about 1735. Details of the "tar and feathering" incident will be mentioned under John Parke (I).

      Eventually, Roger Parke, Jr.'s children began to move into northern Hunterdon County, where land was offered for sale. However, Roger was able to keep his 200 acres of land in Hopewell until his death. In the 1740o's, the land was put up for public auction and Jacob Stout and his wife, Grace Parke Stout purchased the land. Several years later, the land was transferred to James and Kesiah Parke Larison. Both Grace and Kesiah were said to be the daughters of Roger Parke, Jr. (Source: Ralph Ege,"Pioneers of Old Hopewell”.)

      Recent information has been received on the old Parke farm which has been sold several times. It is not known if Kesiah actually lived on the property since James and Keziah Larison already owned property, but the old Larison house still stands and is presently occupied. The property that once belonged to Roger Parke Sr., has now become a beautiful homesite.

      The time of Dr. Roger Parke Sr.'s death is not certain, but it is believed he might have died about 1739, as about this time," Jr."disappears from the Hopewell Town Meeting records and only Roger Parke is shown. Roger Sr., was very active in the community and held the position of" Justice of the Peace" as well as Constable for several years. (Source: Pioneers of Old Hopewell: Ralph Ege)

      Dr. Parke would have been very proud of his home site today. It is sad that the Parke-Larison burial plot set aside by Dr. Roger Parke, no longer exists. Time and neglect has taken its toll on the old cemetery. A great loss!

      It had been difficult to document the fact that Roger Parke of Hexham, England and Burlington Co., West Jersey, could possibly be the same Roger Parke, son of Allan Parke of Lancashire County, England because we had not been able to find a positive link to prove it. However, just recently, it came to my attention that the Old Park Valley cemetery in Hampshire Co., VA where John Park (II) and his family lived, had formerly been called "The Old Cartmel Cemetery", Coincidence???? (Thanks to Major Doug Park of NC, who brought it to my attention.)

      A Family by the name of Cartmell did originally live in the area and some were buried in the old cemetery. In checking further, it was found that the old Cartmell family history was traced back to the Cartmel area in England. Research is being done to find this family to see if there might be a possible connection to the Parkes in Cartmel.


      *See Bibliography for sources:
      "Shenandoah Valley Pioneers and Descendants" by Thomas K. Cartmell.
      New Jersey Colonial Documents, pp. 112, 413.(Hopewell Town Meetings)
      1689, July 16, Roger Parke witnessed the will of George Nicholson, Cal.of Wills, NJ, Doc. p. 339, Vol. I.
      1697, Roger Parke purchased 400 acres of land at Wissamenson on the north side of StonyBrook . This is where he built his home in 1715 and was named in the Eviction Suit of 1731.

      New Jersey Archives: Hunterdon Co., NJ, History of the town ofBethlehem. "A piece of land situated on the sides of the mountain, above Jugtown was deeded by Nathan Parke and his wife, Mary, April 26 1763 toJohn Chambers of Bethlehem. Later signatures found relating to this deed were: Robert Johnston in 1765, Cornelius Anderson in 1767, PhilipJohnston and William Nixson in 1810. The writer has not been able to locate this area or find a copy of the deed. However, it is known that Nathan did own land in the area even when he left for North Carolina, as his wife returned after Nathan's death to sue for monies owned Nathan, deceased, for property he had sold.
      NJ Archives: First series, Vol. 29, p. 396 (1773-74). A list of letters at the post office at Trenton: James Park, Bethlehem; Robert Parke; Job Phillips, Hopewell. This places a Robert Parke from Hopewell during that time period.

      Town Records of Hopewell, NJ Society of Colonial Dames of America, p.74, Nov. 29, 1737.
      "John Parke, son of Roger Parke by the dictates of the law hath recorded a dark brown horse supposed to be about 7 years old with a white streake down his face and a small crop on the off ear a darke brand on his rearthye which cannot be discovered what it is, he is about thirteen handshye he came about His Fathers Plantation lst of May last". (John Parke, son of Roger Parke Sr, would not have been in the Hopewell area in 1737, having left the area rather suddenly in 1735. Therefore, the above, indicates that this John was a son of Roger Parke who still owned the land. Question: was this Roger Parke, the son of John Parke (I)? or was Roger Sr, deceased by then, and the Roger Parke mentioned was Roger Parke (II)?

      p.. 7. John Parke, son of Roger Parke, Nov. 29, 1739, p. 809, Nov.21, 1741; Roger Parke, son of John Parke p. 12, Roger Parke, Jr.Overseer of road on North side of Stony Brook. The Roger, son of John Parke, could have been just that, as this Roger did not leave forVirginia until after 1741.

      1738 Poll list (Parke): Roger, son of John Parke, Hopewell, Roger Parke, Jr.,
      (History. of Hunterdon Co., NJ) This would mean that RogerSr., was still alive in 1738 as Roger II was called "Jr"

      "Freeholders" of Hopewell Township., POH, in 1741 were: Parke, Roger;William and John Parke Jr. (This would be Roger Parke II, his son,William and John Parke, Jr., son of John Parke I).

      Research has also been done on a Richard Parkes who came to BurlingtonCo., NJ. per deed dated April 8, 1682, in which Richard sold his land toWilliam Evans. Did he leave the area? Next record of a Richard Parke/sis shown when Daniel and Richard Parkes sold land to George Marple in1752 (Gosion Neck, Burlg. Co., NJ. ) and Richard and Daniel Parke to John Inskeep, 1754, Gloucester, Burlg. Co., NJ.

      Daniel Parks sold land to Charles Reed in 1751. ( The author had copies of these deeds about fifteen years ago, but cannot locate them at this time) At one time, 1000 Acres of land was involved and they were noted as having a saw mill. I would say that this is the Park/e/s line from Gloucester Co., New Jersey.

      It is my opinion that there was only one Roger Parke who came toBurlington Co., NJ as a Quaker, became a Justice of the Peace for several years, moved to Hopewell, NJ and had children, Ann, John and then RogerJr. All Parke descendants of these children have been well documented. The name of Park/e/s/es has been noted on various descendants of the same line. Even Richard, Daniel and Paul Park/e/s of Burlington and Gloucester Co., NJ had their names spelled various ways. Richard did not have a son Roger Parke born about 1664!!!! - (Cecilia Parke) after viewing all the research material available and obtaining opinions from well known genealogists in New Jersey.

      Some say he died Nov. 5, 1737 but I have no idea where that comes from. So there is yet no basis in fact for it.” [2, 3, 6, 17, 18]

  • Sources 
    1. [S28] Roger Parke (1682), Hugh Parks, Various, 1998 Vol. 35, No. 2.

    2. [S163] Ancestors of Roger Parke, Immigrant, Cecilia B. Parke.

    3. [S164] Descendants of Dr. Roger Parke, Sr.

    4. [S383] Parke Ancestry - Miner Descent .

    5. [S1128] Miner Descent.

    6. [S1294] Park/Parks/Parke Families File.

    7. [S1012] Parke/Jewell/Robinson/Patison Family - Evans Family WebPage.

    8. [S1294] Park/Parks/Parke Families File, bef 25 Jun 1648.

    9. [S104] Parke & Cobb Family Genealogy.

    10. [S28] Roger Parke (1682), Hugh Parks, Various, 1998 Vol. 35 No. 3.

    11. [S28] Roger Parke (1682), Hugh Parks, Various, 1998 Vol.35, No.2.

    12. [S1294] Park/Parks/Parke Families File, bet 1737-1739, in house built 1715 on north side of Stony Brook, Hopewell, Hunterdon Co., NJ.

    13. [S28] Roger Parke (1682), Hugh Parks, Various, 1998 Vol.35, No.3.

    14. [S1012] Parke/Jewell/Robinson/Patison Family - Evans Family WebPage, or in Frith, North Holker.

    15. [S28] Roger Parke (1682), Hugh Parks, Various.

    16. [S1012] Parke/Jewell/Robinson/Patison Family - Evans Family WebPage, Gives the day as 19 Apr 1676.

    17. [S5] Possible Origins of some Park Families in the Eastern Part of Old Rowan County, North Carolina, Percival David Park, p. 181.

    18. [S28] Roger Parke (1682), Hugh Parks, Various, 1998 Vol. 35, No. 3.


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